Tagged: seizures

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Meet Stephen

Here is another post in the series Faces of Epilepsy. Martha tells the story of her brother Stephen and the complexities and fullness of his life. My brother, Stephen Yocum, had epilepsy as long as I can remember.  Stephen was 3 ½ years older than me, yet the difference in years never felt that far (partly because he was only a year ahead in school).  For Stephen, epilepsy was only one of many of his...

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Meet Trevor – Part 2

continued from yesterday… We did go on to have several months of seizure freedom.  During those months Trevor continued to make developmental progress in spite of his abnormal EEG.  Which remained intermittently spikey over the left side.  I never had a peace settle over me that our journey was over.  I always had this hunted feeling.  Like we were being stalked by the Seizure Monster.  But our neurologists insisted he was on a positive path...

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Meet Trevor – Part 1

Continuing with the Faces of Epilepsy series, I’d like to introduce you to my friend Danielle. Her son Trevor has Infantile Spasms, a life threatening form of Epilepsy. They, together with her husband Jonathan and older children Bristel and Toby, have been on quite a journey. Listen to her and I guarantee you will laugh, cry, and be amazed… I should establish up front that I have tendency to take the scenic route.  If you’re...

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I’d Like a Cocktail Please

Sometimes Epilepsy is treatable. Even when it’s not, people go to great lengths to reduce the number of seizures they may have. The goal of any treatment is to achieve the greatest amount of seizure control with minimal side effects. Let’s take a look at the options: AEDs – or Antiepileptic Drugs. There are lots of them. Sometimes conquering seizures requires a drug cocktail. Specific drugs work on specific seizure types. If the first few...

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Meet Tara

This is another guest post in the series, “Faces of Epilepsy.” I’m grateful to Tara for giving us the perspective of being an adult with Epilepsy. She writes here and her posts reflect her hope-filled and joyful attitude. I am a mother of two beautiful children. I am filled with hope, laughter and self-esteem. I am an author, a motivational speaker, a community volunteer and best yet… a full-time mom. I move frequently and travel...

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Meet Liam

With total bias, I bring you my favorite guest writer in the series, “Faces of Epilepsy.” As we know, when one person is diagnosed with Epilepsy, their entire family is affected in some way. Liam is my oldest son and here he gives words to what it’s like living with a sibling with a disability. In the interest of full disclosure, I gave him free reign to say what he wanted about us but edited...

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Meet Jayla

This is another guest post in the series “Faces of Epilepsy.” It was written by 4 year old Jayla’s mother Emily. Pay close attention to all the different kinds of seizures Jayla has had, and all of the different medications she tried to fight them. “Our Roller Coaster Known as Epilepsy” Jayla Claire was born 9/9/07, a week late, weighing 6 lbs 7 oz. She was born still in her amniotic sack, which doctors claimed...

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Say Whaaat?

Are you ready to learn some big words and get really confused smarter? I told you that seizures can manifest themselves in many ways. What they look like and where on the brain they start defines them more specifically. This is important because if you think you know what a seizure looks like, you may only be familiar with one kind of seizure. Let’s break down what may happen during a seizure. Sometimes people with...

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Meet Dakota

This is the first guest post in the series “Faces of Epilepsy.” It’s written by Shannon, mother of two beautiful children, one of whom has Epilepsy. Here is her story:  I have been exposed to seizures for some time now. One of my close friends was diagnosed with epilepsy when we were in middle school, and although I had never really seen one of her seizures, I do know how they took a toll on her body....

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So What Is Epilepsy?

When a person has two or more seizures not provoked by a specific event (trauma,infection, chemical change) s/he is considered to have Epilepsy. You can have a seizure but not have Epilepsy, but having Epilepsy means you’re having seizures. Stay with me. When your baby is sick, your doctor tells you what temperature she can have before you should bring her to the ED. If it gets super high, she’s at risk for a febrile...