Tagged: inclusion

2

Snippets of Siblings

— 1 — So we all know that disability effects the entire family, right? While we as parents do our best to maintain balance in our lives and form healthy habits to manage stress, it can be more difficult to be a sibling of a child with a disability. But it’s certainly not all bad… — 2 — Check out this incredible video of a girl who has a twin sister with Cerebral Palsy. You will...

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The Boy Who Said Hi

Meet our third Super Hero: The Boy Who Said Hi. It really is that easy, you know. I was standing in line to meet Paralympic Gold Medalist Victoria Arlen. The Boy Who Said Hi asked his grandfather why they were meeting her. He replied by saying Victoria is a world class athlete who has worked really hard and competed in London this summer. His response was totally strengths based. If that sounds like no big deal...

29

Letter To The Others

You’ve seen me at the playground with my son and passed us in the mall.  He is the one in the wheelchair, the one who drools, and vocalizes with insistence instead of words. I owe you an apology, not for who my son is, but for what I’ve done to you. I tend to be pretty zealous about the words you choose, and in doing so probably shut you down. You see, I really don’t...

3

Just for a Day

Just for a day I forget about seizures, about IEPs and lurking surgeries. Just for a day, I sit on my couch and shush my children so I can hear who won gold; I get on my feet and cheer for every athlete; I look on in amazement as a guy with one leg hops over a high jump. Just for a day (or so) I was glued to the Paralympics and I was moved....

3

Seven Snippets of Inspiration

— 1 — The Paralympics 2012 has been a game changer for people with disabilities. Oscar Pistorius, the double amputee from South Africa also known as the Blade Runner, put them on the map when he competed in the Olympic Games this summer. The Paralympic Committee worked hard to get commentators who are athletes with disabilities and former Paralympians. This served to educate the public as we watched the Games. And the people came, and...

2

What’s Up with Courtesy Medals?

I’ve been glued to the Paralympics this week and love how this event puts people with disabilities center stage based on their own achievements. There’s just one thing that bugs me; why are guide runners getting medals? After watching Wheelchair Rugby, we’ve all learned never to pet someone who uses a wheelchair, right? Sometimes people with disabilities are accompanied by a caretaker, interpreter, or guide. The rule is, if you want to speak to the...

5

Why I Love Wheelchair Rubgy

They’re kickin’ a** and taking names. Wheelchair rugby is played on a basketball court and is a mix of rugby, basketball,and handball. So why do they call it Murderball? I could tell you that the term was popluarized with the release of the 2005 documentary of the same name which was made to raise funds for the US Paralympic team, or you could watch this: And the US has not lost a World Championship nor...

1

They Did Whaaaat?

Today is World Cerebral Palsy Day. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate than to acknowledge the amazing achievements happening at the London 2012 Paralympics. What incredible things are happening in London right now, you ask? Besides the Irish runner whose mom got to present him with the gold medal, or the blind runner who held up a marriage proposal sign after crossing the finish, or the big Oscar Pistorius upset, or my...

2

Smokin’ Hot Bods

Thank-you to reader Hannah who asked, “How can two people with such varied disabilities race against each other?” It’s important to note that these athletes are in top physical shape for whatever their bodies allow. Also, great effort has gone into making these Games fair and competitive so the athletes are earning their medals. The Paralympics cover competitions for athletes that fit into 1 of 10 impairments types. Some of these include impaired muscle power...

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Double Dog Dare

  So I know you didn’t see the opening ceremonies of the Paralympics if you’re one of my American readers. How do I know, you ask? The US Olympic Committee only sold 5.5 hours of broadcasting rights to NBC. If you’re in Australia you may see 100 hours and, of course, the Brits will get to watch up to 400 hours of programming. This is interesting because the US Olympic committee seems to think we’re...