Tagged: communication

4

Speech Update

Aidan has been using his Speak for Yourself App with keyguard for two weeks now. We went into this knowing that Aidan understands cause and effect, can isolate his pointer finger and shows intention to communicate. To get Aidan started, we’ve used his most motivating activity. Can you guess what that is? Yes, driving. We’re using a core word (on) in a totally functional way. He actually needs someone to turn his wheelchair on. Check...

17

Standing in the Way

Aidan communicates in many ways but using words formed by his mouth is not one of them. His iPad is one of his primary tools of communication. He has long understood cause and effect and has shown intent to communicate, or he reaches out to push buttons. Buttons that say what I want them to say. His app is easy to use and allows him to participate in class and make requests at mealtime. Here...

3

It’s Just About Getting the Words

“It’s just about getting the words,” my chorus director said. She had 200 deer in the headlights faces looking at her as we were attempting to learn a new piece of music. We were singing in an unfamiliar African language. For the most part we had the tempo and tune. That was actually enough to covey that it was a joyful song. But about what exactly? I think about all of the ways Aidan communicates...

4

Wonder Wheels

Welcome new readers. Thank-you for joining us on this journey. Here you’ll learn about including a child with a significant disability in everyday life. I write about wheelchairs and seizures and family and school and all sorts of things in between. Please take a moment to check out our About Us page for my favorite posts and say hello in the comments section. *********** If you saw the amazing video about our accessible home remodel...

4

Sad

“What does Aidan understand?” It’s the $64,000 question; one I ask myself every day. Because Aidan doesn’t have expressive language skills, or, he can’t tell us what he understands and doesn’t understand, I’ve become a detectives of sorts. I watch Aidan’s facial expressions, follow his eyes, try to decipher his actions, look for patterns of behavior. There’s always a chance I could be wrong, that I’m assigning meaning to something that’s not there. Did he...