Tagged: accessibility

3

Just for a Day

Just for a day I forget about seizures, about IEPs and lurking surgeries. Just for a day, I sit on my couch and shush my children so I can hear who won gold; I get on my feet and cheer for every athlete; I look on in amazement as a guy with one leg hops over a high jump. Just for a day (or so) I was glued to the Paralympics and I was moved....

3

Seven Snippets of Inspiration

— 1 — The Paralympics 2012 has been a game changer for people with disabilities. Oscar Pistorius, the double amputee from South Africa also known as the Blade Runner, put them on the map when he competed in the Olympic Games this summer. The Paralympic Committee worked hard to get commentators who are athletes with disabilities and former Paralympians. This served to educate the public as we watched the Games. And the people came, and...

2

What’s Up with Courtesy Medals?

I’ve been glued to the Paralympics this week and love how this event puts people with disabilities center stage based on their own achievements. There’s just one thing that bugs me; why are guide runners getting medals? After watching Wheelchair Rugby, we’ve all learned never to pet someone who uses a wheelchair, right? Sometimes people with disabilities are accompanied by a caretaker, interpreter, or guide. The rule is, if you want to speak to the...

11

Double Dog Dare

  So I know you didn’t see the opening ceremonies of the Paralympics if you’re one of my American readers. How do I know, you ask? The US Olympic Committee only sold 5.5 hours of broadcasting rights to NBC. If you’re in Australia you may see 100 hours and, of course, the Brits will get to watch up to 400 hours of programming. This is interesting because the US Olympic committee seems to think we’re...

7

Getting Naked at Church

I may love skinny dipping more than the average person, but at church I’m all about blending in. This year the wave-making mama in me collided with the quiet pew sitter. As the mom of a child with a significant developmental disability, I’m comfortable making you a little bit uncomfortable. I have no problem commenting on accessibility, or offering suggestions about how to talk to Aidan (just start with “hi”), or allowing him to lean...

1

Olympic Driving

I’ve wanted to share an update about how well Aidan is driving. He’s reached Gold Medal status around here. Aidan happens to love going into small spaces and most of the time doesn’t crash at all. It’s just not as easy as it looks. It took awhile for him to start using backwards but he’s getting the hang of it. He LOVES driving on his own. And for a bonus clip I give you the...

5

Thankful Thursday

Today I’m thankful for the beach. Actually, every day I’m thankful for the beach. I’m glad it’s there, offering me possibility and inviting me home. I was raised on the beach the way Tarzan was raised in the jungle.  I collected shells, built sand cars, ran away, rocked my Wonder Woman bathing suit, learned to swim, maybe went skinny dipping, nearly drowned, all in the great Atlantic Ocean. I lived for a brief stint in...

2

My Former Life

I had a great life before kids. Wait, let me rephrase that….my life was different before kids and it was great in a different way. I worked in the field of education in varying capacities and loved it. I love kids, and being creative, and watching young minds blossom. Right before I had Liam, I worked as a teacher’s aide in a third grade classroom with one student in particular. I was given free reign...

1

Maya’s Undiagnosed Life

I love reading Uncommon Sense and so much of Dana’s writing I not only enjoy but can relate to. Her daughter Maya has an undiagnosed disability. Here she speaks about simply relating to other parents: At times I’ve wished for something with a name. At least “Down syndrome” would be a label that people could understand. It’s hard to go to music class, or the pool, or anywhere where we often see the same groups...

2

New Heights

I’m sure at some point I told you the incredible story of Aidan going up a 35 foot tower. We were harnessed together and raised slowly by a team pulling us. It was amazing at the top. Aidan was very vocal and loved looking around. It was a triumphant “Can Do” moment. The instructor at the top of the tower asked if he was doing the zip line. I know this to be 100% safe...