Tagged: accessibility

7

It’s Not All Rainbows and Unicorns

Grab a cup of coffee. We’re digging in deep today. Before we start, please read this post from a mom who has a disability herself and has a child with a disability. Her writing sparked a few robust FaceBook conversations (you should totally friend me so you can be part of those), which is what passionate voices and bold writing should do because respectful conversations are a win-win. Meriah states that “Disability does not suck. The inaccessibility of...

8

Day Without My Voice

Drawing inspiration from both Aidan, my non-verbal 12 year old, and Mary, another mom of a daughter who is non-verbal, I decided to spend one day without my voice. I learned so much a few years ago when I spent the afternoon in Aidan’s power chair. Unlike Mary, I didn’t have much of a plan nor was I really familiar with a particular speech app on Aidan’s ipad. The one we originally purchased for him...

4

Wonder Wheels

Welcome new readers. Thank-you for joining us on this journey. Here you’ll learn about including a child with a significant disability in everyday life. I write about wheelchairs and seizures and family and school and all sorts of things in between. Please take a moment to check out our About Us page for my favorite posts and say hello in the comments section. *********** If you saw the amazing video about our accessible home remodel...

5

Thank-You

What do you say when someone builds you a house? It’s seems preposterously small to just say thank-you. I suppose I could write it in the sky in billows of airplane smoke to show the magnitude of our gratitude; or I could cry big sloppy tears to express the depth of this  feeling; I could tattoo my arm to show you this isn’t a passing thought. Would you hear me better if I wrote an...

4

Community Support

Warning – I’m writing angry and off the cuff which probably breaks a lot of rules and is not very wise. A few weeks ago my sister sent me this Tampa Bay Times article about warehousing children with disabilities, or cutting  support so drastically that medically complex kids end up living with the elderly in nursing homes. It’s an absolutely terrifying article and made me more than a little nauseous and I really encourage you...

6

Wheelchair Update

Shasta of Outrageous Fortune recently wrote this regarding a search for an appropriate wheelchair for her son Malachai: I worry that if I get him a power wheelchair that I’m “caving” or “giving up” on him ever walking, because why would he want to try crawling if he already had something that propelled him around? (Indeed, he already does that with me.) But I worry that if I force him to be in a manual...

8

Humbled, Grateful, Amazed

My response to an Invitation to Community… It’s humbling to ask for help, but another thing altogether to receive it without even asking. Believe it or not, it’s a bit awkward….and wonderful, and beautiful, and overwhelming. “What about the starving children in Africa? How about the other Medical Moms facing similar journeys? Wouldn’t you rather just bake me a casserole?” In the midst of Aidan’s medical trials, I’ve worked hard to practice the posture of...

4

An Invitation to Community

This post is continued from yesterday and is an invitation from Sue and Talley:       I’d like you to meet the Bowie family—Heather, aka Supermom and serious blogger with a slight addiction to frappacinos; Garreth, Dad, gifted Irish cabinet maker who now shares more of his giftedness as an LNA; Liam, resident funny adolescent with an insatiable reading appetite; and Aidan, giggling social boy who rocks the drums and his power wheelchair through...

5

Potty Talk

My friend Sue asked me asked me a few months ago if Aidan could use the one very small bathroom in our house. I replied, “Of course he can.” Turns out, she was asking the wrong question. Although I’ve actually appreciated blog posts about toileting issues for kids with disabilities, I’ve made a decision not to write about them.  I will, however, attempt to give you some basic information and you’ll have to fill in...

9

Best.Decision.Ever

To think I almost missed this: my son, out and about enjoying life. Here’s one thing I can be thankful for every single day without hesitation – Aidan’s power wheelchair. It’s given him independence. And to think I almost said no. No, I don’t believe he can drive that. No, it’s too complicated to be a part of our life. No, it’s just not appropriate. No, Aidan’s not smart enough. I’m so glad Aidan proved...